PA Coalition for World Class Math

                                              Mathematics Standards

World Class Math Standards Are:

Mathematically sound with respect to the selection, emphasis, and progression of topics; and mathematically accurate in all aspects. In compliance with the National Math Panel's Final Report, fluency in the standard algorithms of arithmetic is required in a timely manner, as is fluency in computation with fractions, decimals, and negative numbers, and the quick / automatic recall of number facts. Read about the importance of the standard algorithms here.

  • Developed with significant involvement by professional mathematicians, in addition to mathematics educators and others. The National Mathematics Advisory Panel's Final Report:  Foundations forMathematics Framework identifies the highest priorities among the California Math Standards and provides examples to show exactly what is expected at each grade level

    Indiana: Indiana's Math Standards consistently receive high ratings.

    Massachusetts: The Adopted Standards and the 2004 Supplement also receive high ratings consistently.

    Washington: The state of Washington recently upgraded its math standards. A group of parents, university math professors, and other concerned Washington citizens volunteered their time and talents to create the Washington Exemplary Mathematics Standards. The standards officially adopted by the state of Washington relied heavily on this citizens' draft.

    The 2001 Singapore Math Standards should also be used for benchmarking. These standards underpinned the first-in-the-world performance of Singapore's students at fourth and eighth grade through repeated administrations of the TIMSS assessment.

    A final note on the importance of including professional mathematicians in the standards-developing and review process:

    Dr. Sandra Stotsky's letter to the editor of Time magazine (4/30/09) responds to Walter Isaacson's 4/15/09 article, "How to Raise the Standard in America's Schools." Stotsky writes:

    "One alarm bell Isaacson's article should have rung is why no one seems to expect the participation of the nation's mathematicians or their two professional societies in the construction of national mathematics standards for K-12. No other nation would dream of developing national mathematics standards without a sign-off by the country's mathematics community. Perhaps this exclusion of mathematicians is one reason children in the U.S. do not do as well on the international scene in mathematics as we would like them to. As a former official at the Massachusetts Department of Education, I will tell you that students' 2007 scores in international testing in that state showed that the involvement of mathematicians and scientists in the development of its nationally recognized mathematics and science standards and assessments made a difference." Sandra Stotsky, Fayetteville, AR

    How Math Standards Impact Your Child's Education 

    Mathematics content standards have a profound impact on classroom instruction. Many local districts refer directly to the standards when designing programs, selecting textbooks, and creating assessments to measure student progress. Additionally, our state test – the PSSA – must, by law, be aligned with the PA math standards. Accountability rules ensure that classroom teachers stress the standards’ "eligible content." Improving math standards is a key step in improving math instruction in Pennsylvania.

  • Based on international benchmarks of global leaders such as Singapore, Finland, Hong Kong, Belgium, and Japan. Nationally recognized state standards are also useful as models: California, Indiana, and Massachusetts were leaders in creating internationally benchmarked standards that are worthy of being emulated.  (Additional links to these standards appear below.)
  • Streamlined, with fewer topics for greater depth of learning.
  •  Cautious of calculator use in early grades; no calculators used in state tests in early grades.
  •  Informed by the National Math Advisory Panel's Final Report and the NCTM's Curricular Focal Points document. See our page on the National Math Panel  specialists, classroom teachers, and the general public, in the standard-setting process and in the review and design of mathematical test items for state, NAEP, and commercial tests." 
  • Coherent and easy to use and understand; they specify essential content for each year at the elementary and middle school level and for Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. They enable parents, teachers, curriculum developers and other

      The following states have clear, coherent, user-friendly standards that were benchmarked to those of the highest performing countries on such international comparisons as TIMSS and PISA. They merit use as models or templates for states and other entities involved in writing mathematics standards.  

    California: Widely regarded as the gold standard, the California Mathematics Framework identifies the highest priorities among the California Math Standards and provides examples to show exactly what is expected at each grade level

    Indiana: Indiana's Math Standards consistently receive high ratings.

    Massachusetts: The Adopted Standards and the 2004 Supplement also receive high ratings consistently.

    Washington: The state of Washington recently upgraded its math standards. A group of parents, university math professors, and other concerned Washington citizens volunteered their time and talents to create the Washington Exemplary Mathematics Standards. The standards officially adopted by the state of Washington relied heavily on this citizens' draft.

    The 2001 Singapore Math Standards should also be used for benchmarking. These standards underpinned the first-in-the-world performance of Singapore's students at fourth and eighth grade through repeated administrations of the TIMSS assessment.

    How Math Standards Impact Your Child's Education 

    Mathematics content standards have a profound impact on classroom instruction. Many local districts refer directly to the standards when designing programs, selecting textbooks, and creating assessments to measure student progress. Additionally, our state test – the PSSA – must, by law, be aligned with the PA math standards. Accountability rules ensure that classroom teachers stress the standards’ "eligible content." Improving math standards is a key step in improving math instruction in Pennsylvania.

  • Pennsylvania Standards: Improvement Needed  

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and the American Federation of Teachers have all conducted reviews of state mathematics standards. All agree that Pennsylvania students and teachers need and deserve better standards in math. 

     Fordham Institute: "D" for PA Math Standards

    UPDATE:

    Fordham Institute downgrades PA math standards to "F" rating; "among the worst in the country"

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute    is a not-for-profit organization that conducts research in education in the United States. It has reviewed the mathematics standards in all   50 states. It awarded an "A" grade to only three states: California, Indiana, and Massachusetts. The  full report can be found here:   State of the State Math Standards.

    Other states, including PA, were given lower ratings for these reasons:

    • Widespread use of calculators
    •  Disregard for memorization of basic facts
    • Insufficient emphasis on the standard algorithms
    • Inadequate attention to fraction arithmetic
    • Exessive focus on patterns and manipulatives
    • Overemphasis on estimation and data analysis

    The Pennsylvania review - a grade of "D" - can be found here: Fordham gives PA math standards a "D."

    The new review - a grade of of "F" - can be found here.

    California, Indiana, and Massachusetts were the only states awarded "A's": Fordham reviews of the "A" states.

     American Federation of Teachers (AFT) findings: Pennsylvania math standards do not meet criteria for clarity, specificity, and content

    The AFT reviews content standards in all subject areas including mathematics. The AFT Review found the PA math standards do not meet criteria for clarity, specificity, and content in any grade band (elementary, middle school, and high school). 

            U.S. Chamber of Commerce: "D" grade for      PA Standards

     In its "Leaders and Laggards" report, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce gave PA a grade of "D" for "rigor of standard

     

     

     

            Common Core Math                      Standards

    Pennsylvania is among the majority of states that have committed to adopting the Common Core Mathematics Standards. Although it is generally agreed that they are not as strong as the best international standards, they have enjoyed numerous favorable reviews. The Fordham Institute awarded the Common Core Math Standards an "A-"; and the Core Knowledge Foundation also supports the Common Core Math Standards.

    Critical reviews have been written by James Milgram, Jonathan Goodman, Ze'ev Wurman / Sandra Stotsky, and others.

     


     

                                                  Mathematics Standards

    World Class Math Standards   

     Update: The U.S. Coalition for World Class Math, in conjunction with its state affiliates has released Designed Principles for K-12 Mathematics Standards. The Design Principles can be found here.

    World Class Math Standards Are:

    Mathematically sound with respect to the selection, emphasis, and progression of topics; and mathematically accurate in all aspects. In compliance with the National Math Panel's Final Report, fluency in the standard algorithms of arithmetic is required in a timely manner, as is fluency in computation with fractions, decimals, and negative numbers, and the quick / automatic recall of number facts. Read about the importance of the standard algorithms here.

  • Developed with significant involvement by professional mathematicians, in addition to mathematics educators and others. The National Mathematics Advisory Panel's Final Report:  Foundations forMathematics Framework identifies the highest priorities among the California Math Standards and provides examples to show exactly what is expected at each grade level

    Indiana: Indiana's Math Standards consistently receive high ratings.

    Massachusetts: The Adopted Standards and the 2004 Supplement also receive high ratings consistently.

    Washington: The state of Washington recently upgraded its math standards. A group of parents, university math professors, and other concerned Washington citizens volunteered their time and talents to create the Washington Exemplary Mathematics Standards. The standards officially adopted by the state of Washington relied heavily on this citizens' draft.

    The 2001 Singapore Math Standards should also be used for benchmarking. These standards underpinned the first-in-the-world performance of Singapore's students at fourth and eighth grade through repeated administrations of the TIMSS assessment.

    A final note on the importance of including professional mathematicians in the standards-developing and review process:

    Dr. Sandra Stotsky's letter to the editor of Time magazine (4/30/09) responds to Walter Isaacson's 4/15/09 article, "How to Raise the Standard in America's Schools." Stotsky writes:

    "One alarm bell Isaacson's article should have rung is why no one seems to expect the participation of the nation's mathematicians or their two professional societies in the construction of national mathematics standards for K-12. No other nation would dream of developing national mathematics standards without a sign-off by the country's mathematics community. Perhaps this exclusion of mathematicians is one reason children in the U.S. do not do as well on the international scene in mathematics as we would like them to. As a former official at the Massachusetts Department of Education, I will tell you that students' 2007 scores in international testing in that state showed that the involvement of mathematicians and scientists in the development of its nationally recognized mathematics and science standards and assessments made a difference." Sandra Stotsky, Fayetteville, AR

     

    How Math Standards Impact Your Child's Education 

    Mathematics content standards have a profound impact on classroom instruction. Many local districts refer directly to the standards when designing programs, selecting textbooks, and creating assessments to measure student progress. Additionally, our state test – the PSSA – must, by law, be aligned with the PA math standards. Accountability rules ensure that classroom teachers stress the standards’ "eligible content." Improving math standards is a key step in improving math instruction in Pennsylvania.

  • Based on international benchmarks of global leaders such as Singapore, Finland, Hong Kong, Belgium, and Japan. Nationally recognized state standards are also useful as models: California, Indiana, and Massachusetts were leaders in creating internationally benchmarked standards that are worthy of being emulated.  (Additional links to these standards appear below.)
  • Streamlined, with fewer topics for greater depth of learning.
  •  Cautious of calculator use in early grades; no calculators used in state tests in early grades.
  •  Informed by the National Math Advisory Panel's Final Report and the NCTM's Curricular Focal Points document. See our page on the National Math Panel  specialists, classroom teachers, and the general public, in the standard-setting process and in the review and design of mathematical test items for state, NAEP, and commercial tests." 
  • Coherent and easy to use and understand; they specify essential content for each year at the elementary and middle school level and for Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. They enable parents, teachers, curriculum developers and other

      The following states have clear, coherent, user-friendly standards that were benchmarked to those of the highest performing countries on such international comparisons as TIMSS and PISA. They merit use as models or templates for states and other entities involved in writing mathematics standards.  

    California: Widely regarded as the gold standard, the California Mathematics Framework identifies the highest priorities among the California Math Standards and provides examples to show exactly what is expected at each grade level

    Indiana: Indiana's Math Standards consistently receive high ratings.

    Massachusetts: The Adopted Standards and the 2004 Supplement also receive high ratings consistently.

    Washington: The state of Washington recently upgraded its math standards. A group of parents, university math professors, and other concerned Washington citizens volunteered their time and talents to create the Washington Exemplary Mathematics Standards. The standards officially adopted by the state of Washington relied heavily on this citizens' draft.

    The 2001 Singapore Math Standards should also be used for benchmarking. These standards underpinned the first-in-the-world performance of Singapore's students at fourth and eighth grade through repeated administrations of the TIMSS assessment.

    How Math Standards Impact Your Child's Education 

    Mathematics content standards have a profound impact on classroom instruction. Many local districts refer directly to the standards when designing programs, selecting textbooks, and creating assessments to measure student progress. Additionally, our state test – the PSSA – must, by law, be aligned with the PA math standards. Accountability rules ensure that classroom teachers stress the standards’ "eligible content." Improving math standards is a key step in improving math instruction in Pennsylvania.

  • Pennsylvania Standards: Improvement Needed  

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

    , and the American Federation of Teachers have all conducted reviews of state mathematics standards. All agree that Pennsylvania students and teachers need and deserve better standards in math. 

     Fordham Institute: "D" for PA Math Standards

    The Thomas B. Fordham Institute is a not-for-profit organization that conducts research in education in the United States. It has reviewed the mathematics standards in all 50 states. It awarded an "A" grade to only three states: California, Indiana, and Massachusetts. The full report can be found here: State of the State Math Standards.

    Other states, including Pennsylvania, were given lower ratings for the following reasons:

  • Widespread use of calculators
  • Disregard for memorization of basic facts
  • Insufficient emphasis on the standard algorithms
  • Inadequate attention to fraction arithmetic
  • Exessive focus on patterns and manipulatives
  • Overemphasis on estimation and data analysis

    The Pennsy lvania review - a grade of "D" - can be found here: Fordham gives PA math standards a "D."

  • California, Indiana, and Massachusetts were the only states awarded "A's:"  Fordham reviews of the "A" states.

  •  American Federation of Teachers (AFT) findings: Pennsylvania math standards do not meet criteria for clarity, specificity, and content

    The AFT reviews content standards in all subject areas including mathematics. The AFT review found the PA math standards do not meet criteria for clarity, specificity, and content in any grade band (elementary, middle school, and high school). 

     U.S. Chamber of Commerce: "D" grade for PA Standards

    In its "Leaders and Lagg

    ards" report, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce gave PA a grade of "D" for "rigor of standards.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    title